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Students' Portfolios


 
 Angela Campbell

 Department:  
Biological Sciences
 Year of Study: 5th year Ph.D. Student
 Mentor:  Dr. Godwin Ananaba, Associate
 Professor of Biology





Research Experiences:
1. Cloning Chlyamidia trachomatis plasmid antigens into pGKVAX vectors.
2. Transformation of Lactobacillus species with pGKVAX-pgp3.
3. Colonization studies of a mouse model with transformed Lactobacillus.

Publication:
Igietseme, J., He, Q., Joseph, K., Eko, F., Lyn, D., Ananaba, G., Campbell, A., Bandea, C., and C.M. Black; Role of T lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of Chlamydia disease. Journal of Infectious Disease. 2009 September 15; 200(6):926-34. Click here to link to the article.

Research Presentations:
Oral
The Development of a Prophylactic Vaccine Against Chlamydia Trachomatis Genital Infection. Angela Kersh, Eno Ekong, Godwin Ifere, Erika  Barr, Tesfaye Belay, and Godwin Ananaba, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA. Francis Eko and Joseph Igietseme, Morehouse School of Medicine, CDC & Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

The Construction of Chlamydia Trachomatis Outer Membrane Protein 1 (Omp1) For Lactobacillus Species Platform.  Angela Kersh, Eno Ekong, Godwin Ifere, Erika  Barr, Tesfaye Belay, and Godwin Ananaba, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA. Francis Eko and Joseph Igietseme, Morehouse School of Medicine, CDC & Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

Comparative Growth Study Ofpgk12 Transformed Lactobacillus Species: Potential Use For Delivery Of Chlamydia Trachomatis Antigens. Angela Kersh, Erika  Barr, Tesfaye Belay, and Godwin Ananaba, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA. Francis Eko and Joseph Igietseme, Morehouse School of Medicine, CDC & Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

Poster

Cloning And Expression Of Chlamydia Trachomatis Outer Membrane Heterologous Protein 1 (Omp1) In Lactobacillus Species. A. Campbell, G. Ifere, T. Belay, E. Barr, F. O. Eko, J. Igietseme, C Black, and G. Ananaba, Clark Atlanta University, Morehouse School of Medicine, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

Comparative Growth Study Ofpgk12 Transformed Lactobacillus Species: Potential Use For Delivery Of Chlamydia Trachomatis Antigens. Angela Kersh, Erika Barr, Tesfaye Belay, and Godwin Ananaba, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA. Francis Eko and Joseph Igietseme, Morehouse School of Medicine, CDC & Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

Recombinant Lactobacillus Species as Potential Vaccine Delivery Vehicle. A. Kersh, T. Belay, G. Ifere, E. Barr, K. Gordon, D. Lyn, F. Eko, J. Igietseme and G. Ananaba, Clark Atlanta University, Morehouse School of Medicine, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

The Development of Recombinant Plasmid Pgkomp1 For The Transformation of Lactobacillus Vaginalis. A. Kersh, G. Ifere, T. Belay, E. Barr, K. Gordon, D. Lyn, F. Eko, J. Igietseme and G. Ananaba, Clark Atlanta University, Morehouse School of Medicine, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

The Potential of Lactobacillus as a Carrier of Chlamydia trachomatis Cryptic
Plasmid Antigens in Chlamydia Vaccine Development. A. Campbell1, E. Ekong4, G. Ifere1, K. Joseph4, T. Belay3, F. Eko2, N. Diala1, Q. He2, C. Black4, J. Igietseme4, and G. Ananaba1. 1Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA, 2Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 3 Bluefield State University, Bluefield, WV, 4Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA. Click here to link to the poster.

Construction of a Plasmid Vector and Cloning of Major Outer Membrane Protein-1 (Omp-1) A. Campbell1, E. Ekong2, G. Ifere1, T. Belay3, F. O. Eko2, E. Barr1, N. Diala1, D. Okenu2, Q. He2, C. Black4, J. Igietseme4,2, G. Ananaba1; 1Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA, 2Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 3Bluefield State College, Bluefield, WV, 4Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA. Click here to link to the poster.

Research Interests:
Chlamydial genital infectioncaused by Chlamydia trachomatis is the most commonly reported bacterial sexually transmitted disease.  The complications resulting from this sexually transmitted disease include serious reproductive conditions, such as pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility, and ectopic pregnancy. Although chlamydial infections can be treated with antibiotics, most cases of infection are asymptomatic.  Therefore, developing a vaccine is an ideal way to effectively protect against this disease. A promising preventive strategy is the development of a vaccine that utilizes a Lactobacillus species as a live delivery vehicle of chlamydia antigens to the immune system.  Lactobacillus is a part of the normal flora of the human gut and genitourinary tract.  Lactobacilli have an adjuvant effect by enhancing antigen specific immune responses when administered in combination with antigen.  The use of Lactobacillus as an adjuvant may produce large quantities of chlamydia antigens, and furthermore induce substantial immunity.   We hypothesize that recombinant Lactobacilli that express chlamydia antigens will effectively provide lasting protective immunity against chlamydial challenge and will not induce chlamydial pathology.  Therefore, we propose to develop a system that can be used to regenerate transformed Lactobacillus expressing recombinant pGKVAX plasmid carrying Chlamydia trachomatis antigen.

Previous Degrees Obtained:
Talladega College, B.A., Biology, May 2001
University of West Georgia, M.S., Biology, December 2003

Honors:
RISE Scholar, 2006-present
2010 Charles C. Shepard Science Award in the Laboratory and Methods Category for the journal article “Role of T Lymphocytes in the Pathogenesis of Chlamydia Disease”
2007 Georgia Academy of Science 1st Place Oral Presentation Winner

Career Aspirations and Goals:
Become a college professor